drew's blog

and we’re back

April 3, 2011
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I hope ya’ll enjoyed the hiatus as much as I did. I can hardly believe it’s been a month since my last real entry. I’ve had several requests for the blog to continue. All from the same person but that’s neither here nor there. The last month has been a bit chaotic. From the weather to the job things are changing dramatically.  One day it’s freezing & raining with winds strong enough to knock out the power for a few hours, and the next, it’s warm & sunny enough to busk down at the ‘white bridge’ in a T-shirt and shorts. And as far as teaching goes, it’s still really good, with the occasional deviation from plan by host-teachers.  Everything 3rd graders have learned I could recite in a matter of minutes, but it really is a lot. They’ve come a long way. At first they could only say, “Hello!” and now I can ask them about their toys, the weather, the seasons, almost any object in the class room, and I can command with prepositions almost flawlessly. It’s funny, when I first arrived, I was least looking forward to the little ones. I think it was partly because I worked with 3-6 graders in Salt Lake for over a year & I wanted to experience a higher level of maturity, and also because there’s more room for natural conversational advancement with older kids. They can infer more based on skills they’ve already developed. But now, I’m perfectly happy to say that the 3rd graders are one of my favorite groups and I always look forward to seeing them. Sophiko, my host/co-teacher is a wonderful lady to work with too. Besides, I don’t think it would have mattered much if I did work with the upperclassmen. Kids are kids, or rather, boys will be boys, and it’s rare to find a boy that’s willing to put his head down and do the assigned work. At least when they’re tiny there’s a level of fear/respect. Teaching can be almost useless some days depending on how many boys are present.  Discipline reform would do wonders for Georgia. It needs to start at home, though, not at school. As I’m sure I’ve said before, people are still very much soviet influenced. It doesn’t really bother me like a lot of other volunteers I work with. A national mind-set is going to take a generation or two before all the reformation is evident. I’m just glad I played a part, and at the beginning. So there’s that; all the little intricacies of teaching English as a foreign language in a place that’s foreign to me. That, and the fact that my time to leave is fast approaching. I’ll be glad to be home. HOME, home – with the family, no less. But I will miss this place. I already do. I love Georgia.

And I hope you’ve enjoyed the introductory Israel-trip teaser. The iItt. If you want to read more, you should’ve donated money or been a better friend.

Kidding. I’ll have photos when I’m back in America, but I reserve the right to who.. whom? ..I should know this- English teacher and all, to CindyLou who(m) I will publish more written accounts.

OH! Guess who got April Fooled? Me! Tiniko, my deda(mother), told me the new principal at our school called my program directors and requested another volunteer to come work at the school because she wasn’t pleased with my work. When she saw I started to get upset she pointed a finger in my face and said, “You are April Fool.” and then cackled like a witch on Halloween. I didn’t even know they knew about April Fool’s here. I was flabbergasted, and even a little perturbed. I got GOT on my own holiday.

And now, my hands are cold and clammy & I’m hungry for some hammy.

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I'm currently teaching English in the republic of Georgia. I started this blog so that those I love & those interested can read all about my experience.

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